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The Purpose of Intervention: Changing Beliefs about the use of Force

Martha Finnemore

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ISBN 10: 817049205X / ISBN 13: 9788170492054
Verlag: Cornell University Press/Manas Publications, 2004
Gebraucht Zustand: AsNew Hardcover
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Beschreibung

Violence or the potential for violence is a fact of human existence. Many socieities reward martial success or skill at arms. The ways in which members of a particular society use force reveal a great deal about the nature of authroity within the group and about its members priorities. Martha Finnemore uses one type of force, military intervention, as a window onto the shifting character of international society. She examines the changes, over the past four hundred years, in why countries intervene militarily as well as in how they have intervened. It is not the fact of intervention that has altered, she says, but rather the reasons for and meaning behind intervention the conventional understanding of the purposes for which states can and should use force. Printed Pages: 181. Buchnummer des Verkäufers 104220

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Bibliografische Details

Titel: The Purpose of Intervention: Changing ...

Verlag: Cornell University Press/Manas Publications

Erscheinungsdatum: 2004

Einband: Hardcover

Zustand:AsNew

Auflage: First edition.

Über diesen Titel

Inhaltsangabe:

Violence or the potential for violence is a fact of human existence. Many societies, including our own, reward martial success or skill at arms. The ways in which members of a particular society use force reveal a great deal about the nature of authority within the group and about its members’ priorities.

Martha Finnemore uses one type of force, military intervention, as a window onto the shifting character of international society. She examines the changes, over the past 400 years, in why countries intervene militarily as well as in the ways they have intervened. It is not the fact of intervention that has altered, she says, but rather the reasons for and meaning behind intervention—the conventional understanding of the purposes for which states can and should use force.

Finnemore looks at three types of intervention: collecting debts, addressing humanitarian crises, and acting against states perceived as threats to international peace. In all three, she finds that what is now considered "obvious" was vigorously contested or even rejected by people in earlier periods for well-articulated and logical reasons. A broad historical perspective allows her to explicate long-term trends: the steady erosion of force’s normative value in international politics, the growing influence of equality norms in many aspects of global political life, and the increasing importance of law in intervention practices.

Umschlagtext:

"Martha Finnemore has a keen eye for fascinating historical developments. Conceptually, she is a big thinker and she has the historical knowledge and intuition to support her ideas. This is a timely book and all indications are that it will remain so."—Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia

"In exploring how perceptions of utility and legitimacy are intertwined in changing patterns of military intervention, Martha Finnemore has once again broadened our understanding of one of the fundamental aspects of world politics. This rich and provocative book is certain to generate broad interest and debate."—Elizabeth Kier, University of Washington

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