ISBN 10: 1781381151 / ISBN 13: 9781781381151
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Críticas: Written with elan, dexterity and wit, and with an immersion in both critical theory and the history of twentieth century poetry, Under the Spelling Wall has a natural authority, as well as a decisive narrative drive. The range of works proposed for inclusion, and the way in which they are interrelated represents something magnificent in contemporary criticism, a lauding of complexity not in the abstract but in the minutiae of what was published, and how that occurred. The reading of 'Altarwise by Owl-light' is sublimely good and the work on 'Fern Hill' is the most impressive I have ever seen on this poem. It is a model of the single author studies that are formative to a (renewed) critical direction. -- Dr Leo Mellor In many ways this is a brilliant book. Not only does it offer cogent advocacy of Thomas's strength and interest as a poet, it also does so in terms of a many-aspected, adroit and illuminating deployment of the theoretical discourses which have emerged over the last forty years. These two endeavours are, as they should be, mutually reinforcing: the theories really do prove themselves to be illuminating about Thomas, and as a result we feel that Thomas can speak to our contemporary condition and understanding. The argument is passionate, and makes no pretence at any aim other than reasserting the greatness of Thomas's work. -- Professor Ed Larrissey The definitive modern reappraisal of Thomas's poetry ... Goodby's arguments are compelling and draw upon his experience both as a critic and as a practising (and prize-winning) poet. ...This is a welcome and overdue book which will do much to stimulate interest in Dylan Thomas as we approach the centenary of his birth. -- Brian Roper A great book ... Dylan Thomas for our generation, alive and entire. -- James Keery Dylan Thomas - now there was a poet. He published (a few) slim volumes of verse, fought wild women night and day, and drank (apparently, he drank). He could charm a female patron into buying him a house (more than once), wrote a handful of hits for the anthologies (as well as a larger body of obscurer work), and died young - too young. All nature was his - "Now the heron grieves in the weeded verge" and the rest. Wouldn't you like to have met Mr Thomas? Paul Ferris, who would go on to become one of Thomas's biographers, did meet him, albeit briefly, around 1949, in the saloon bar of Swansea's bombed-out Metropole Hotel. Looking, like the Met, a "bit weary", the poet was standing at the counter, "surrounded by people trying to buy him drinks". They were eventually introduced, Ferris recalls. Thomas said one dry yet dutifully treasured line to him - "and turned back to his drink". "He was never safe from his admirers", the biographer remarks, "or they from him." Ferris's anecdote fills a page in Dylan Thomas: A centenary celebration, edited by Thomas's granddaughter Hannah Ellis. Its pages are full of wide-ranging reminiscences about encountering the writing as well as the writer. Ellis has comedians (Terry Jones, Griff Rhys Jones) open and close proceedings, while the expected stories of early discovery and heartfelt tributes come from a former President of the United States (Jimmy Carter), a former Archbishop of Canterbury (Rowan Williams), the musician Cerys Matthews, the actor Michael Sheen and many others. Affection endures, the collection would seem to say, well beyond the selective band of admirers of, say, 18 Poems. It is an impressively eclectic crowd to be still, as it were, sidling up and trying to buy Dylan a pint. There are even a few fellow poets (besides Rowan Williams, that is, whose contribution is in verse), one of whom, Owen Sheers, represents many, in that his contribution is inspired by his interviews with others such as Simon Armitage and Jo Shapcott for a centennial Thomas documentary; and Armitage's marginal notes on Thomas, boiling the poems down to "fundamentals" ("love", "birth", "death"), have a familiar, ur-schoolroom ring to them. Sheers himself admits that at school he was taught not Dylan but R. S. Thomas - but "it still feels as if he's always been there, right from the early days of my reading life". The only poem named in his contribution is, inevitably, that late recreation of early days, "Fern Hill". The expected Thomas works have inspired much of the celebrations of the past year "Fern Hill", "Do not go gentle into that good night", Under Milk Wood - the expected Thomas works, and the seemingly still wonderful story of his life, have inspired much of the celebrations of the past year. In Wales and well beyond, there have been talks and tours, concerts, school workshops, exhibitions, television and theatre dramatizations. Andy Goddard's film Set Fire to the Stars dramatizes a "bohemian" week in the United States in the company of John Malcolm Brinnin. And in print, following Ferris's biography (1977), the earlier one by Constantine FitzGibbon (1965) and the later one by Andrew Lycett (2003), as well as the publication of Thomas's notebooks, letters, film scripts, collected broadcasts, a Life of Caitlin Thomas, and much more, a demand apparently remains - meaning not only for Ellis's "centenary celebration", but The Three Lives of Dylan Thomas by Hilly Janes (inspired by the three portraits of Thomas produced by her father, Alfred Janes). For Janes, Thomas's third "life" - really the afterlife that began on November 9, 1953, when he died in New York - has itself become worthy of extended consideration. She begins it with her father Fred at work on his third portrait of Thomas, "working from memory and a few black-and-white photos", and ends with enthusiasm for this year's "Dylan Thomas 100" celebrations, mingled with suspicions that the old English doubts about Thomas linger on. Under Milk Wood has also reappeared in a centenary edition with an introduction by Catherine Zeta-Jones (whose father owned a sweet factory and whose mother was a seamstress, in a personal variation on the play's romance between the draper Mog Edwards and sweetshop keeper Myfanwy Price). So much for his friend Daniel Jones's belief that a "handful of poems" would outlast the fame of Thomas's "play for voices" - and so much for the "Blakean and modernist revolutionary" beloved of John Goodby, the editor of the "new centenary edition" of Thomas's Collected Poems, and the author of a complementary study, The Poetry of Dylan Thomas: Under the spelling wall. In the autumn issue of Poetry Wales, Professor Goodby has complained about the proceedings gathered under the chemical-sounding title "DT-100" that, for all the many welcome things that have happened, especially in educational terms, they have seen Dylan Thomas the serious poet sidelined and replaced with "Dilute Dylan" - "Thomas-without-tears". Goodby's complaint follows naturally from his edition of the poems and his thorough, equally polemical critical study. In his view, Thomas was a unique hybrid writer: his common touch and his radicalism go hand in hand; the "very popular" performer, broadcaster and writer of comic short stories, the barstool bohemian who once came close to writing a radio comedy called "Quid's Inn" and wanted one day to write a film about the life of Charles Dickens, was also "an unreconstructed representative of the bardic sublime and ... a genuinely difficult modernist poet". Goodby is at pains to respect the populist side of the work even as he focuses intensely on trying to account for the uncompromising modernist responsible for, for example: Now Say nay, Man day man, Dry lover mine The deadrock base and blow the flowered anchor, Should he, for centre sake, hop in the dust, Forsake, the fool, the hardiness of anger. Just as Collected Poems is not wall-to-wall impermeable obscurity - it would be difficult to make a deep difficulty out of "In my craft or sullen art" or "The Hunchback in the Park" - it wouldn't do to overstate the radicalism of work such as "Now", of which this is the first stanza, with its sure-footed patterning (each subsequent stanza follows the same climbing sequence of steps, the opening three words over two lines). And when asked what it meant, Thomas suggested, perhaps disingenuously, that "so far as he knew it had no meaning at all". This doesn's film Set Fire to the Stars dramatizes a "bohemian" week in the United States in the company of John Malcolm Brinnin. And in print, following Ferris's biography (1977), the earlier one by Constantine FitzGibbon (1965) and the later one by Andrew Lycett (2003), as well as the publication of Thomas's notebooks, letters, film scripts, collected broadcasts, a Life of Caitlin Thomas, and much more, a demand apparently remains - meaning not only for Ellis's "centenary celebration", but The Three Lives of Dylan Thomas by Hilly Janes (inspired by the three portraits of Thomas produced by her father, Alfred Janes). For Janes, Thomas's third "life" - really the afterlife that began on November 9, 1953, when he died in New York - has itself become worthy of extended consideration. She begins it with her father Fred at work on his third portrait of Thomas, "working from memory and a few black-and-white photos", and ends with enthusiasm for this year's "Dylan Thomas 100" celebrations, mingled with suspicions that the old English doubts about Thomas linger on. Under Milk Wood has also reappeared in a centenary edition with an introduction by Catherine Zeta-Jones (whose father owned a sweet factory and whose mother was a seamstress, in a personal variation on the play's romance between the draper Mog Edwards and sweetshop keeper Myfanwy Price). So much for his friend Daniel Jones's belief that a "handful of poems" would outlast the fame of Thomas's "play for voices" - and so much for the "Blakean and modernist revolutionary" beloved of John Goodby, the editor of the "new centenary edition" of Thomas's Collected Poems, and the author of a complementary study, The Poetry of Dylan Thomas: Under the spelling wall. In the autumn issue of Poetry Wales, Professor Goodby has complained about the proceedings gathered under the chemical-sounding title "DT-100" that, for all the many welcome things that have happened, especially in educational terms, the...

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