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Rezension: [Faith Wallis's] translation is accurate and animated and she has done a splendid job of situating the work in the context of Bede's early writings on time and the millennium. -- Professor Michael Lapidge, Professor Emeritus and Honorary Research Fellow Bede: Commentary on Revelation. Translated with introduction and notes by Faith Wallis. Translated Texts for Historians 58. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2013. Introduction, pp. 1-96, text, pp. 99-286, Appendix: The capitula lectionum on Revelation ascribed to Bede, pp. 287-91. ISBN 978-1-84631-845-0 George Hardin Brown Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2087 brown@stanford.edu It is ironic that of Bede's nineteen commentaries on Scripture his very first one written at the beginning of his career, this commentary on the Book of Revelation, has now received more careful and extensive scholarship than all the rest. In the past two years an eminent biblical scholar and editor has produced a superb edition of Bede's Commentary on Revelation and two fine scholars have produced translations. Roger Gryson's Bedae Presbyteri Expositio Apocalypseos, Corpus Christianorum Series Latina 121A (Turnhout: Brepols, 2001) is the best edition of all of Bede's commentaries. Now Faith Wallis, known for her Bedan scholarship, especially for Bede's The Reckoning of Time, has produced a translation of the Commentary with introduction and very informative notes that superbly complements Gryson's edition. Her accurate translation of Bede's work along with an informative commentary condenses Gryson's French and Latin notes and adds some additional references. William Weinrich, professor of historical theology at Concordia Seminary and an authority on women in church history, in Latin Commentaries on Revelation (2012), has provided introductions to and translations of four early Latin commentaries, by Victorinus, Apringius, Caesarius, and Bede. His translation of the latter is quite readable with only an occasional inappropriate word (e.g., "hotel" instead of "inn" for Augustine's "hospitio" in the Praefatio, 37), but Wallis's translation, besides being accurate and occasionally adding in brackets Bede's Latin wording, has the advantage of indicating by the use of italics and notes when Bede incorporates within his commentary (as he very frequently does in this early work) comments by patristic authorities such as Tyconius, Primasius, Gregory, and Augustine; her book also provides a Select Bibliography (pp. 292-308) and an excellent Index of Sources and Parallel Passages (pp. 309-17). Bede introduces his work with a verse epigraph, as he does for some of his other earlier works, but this is the only one to precede a biblical commentary. The preface is divided into two sections, the first one on the internal divisions or sections of Revelation (helpfully outlined in Wallis's Table 1 on pp. 62-64) and the second part on the method of interpretation of revelation as proposed by Tyconius. As was usual in his earlier commentaries, Bede takes each verse and provides a brief elucidation and commentary on each verse of Revelation. Bede shapes the meaning of the text by using Primasius and Tyconius and inserting appropriate passages from Augustine, Gregory, and Jerome. In his commentary Bede highlights and stresses a number of themes, such as the Last Judgment and the need for reform. Bede taking the concluding words of Revelation (22:21) to assault the Pelagians for trusting in their own virtues and the Donatists for their exclusivity, stresses that the Lord's grace should "be with you all." For readers who know Bede's works the question must arise: why did Bede, whose writings are seriously concerned about his world and the church but are certainly not apocalyptic, produce as his very first biblical treatise the Commentary on Revelation? Wallis takes up the issue in the section of the Introduction, Date and Circumstances of Composition. She points out that although Bede treats the future end of the world in the closing chapters of The Reckoning of Time and his poem On Judgment Day, "the end is near"Bede: Commentary on Revelation. Translated with introduction and notes by Faith Wallis. Translated Texts for Historians 58. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2013. Introduction, pp. 1-96, text, pp. 99-286, Appendix: The capitula lectionum on Revelation ascribed to Bede, pp. 287-91. ISBN 978-1-84631-845-0 George Hardin Brown Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2087 brown@stanford.edu It is ironic that of Bede's nineteen commentaries on Scripture his very first one written at the beginning of his career, this commentary on the Book of Revelation, has now received more careful and extensive scholarship than all the rest. In the past two years an eminent biblical scholar and editor has produced a superb edition of Bede's Commentary on Revelation and two fine scholars have produced translations. Roger Gryson's Bedae Presbyteri Expositio Apocalypseos, Corpus Christianorum Series Latina 121A (Turnhout: Brepols, 2001) is the best edition of all of Bede's commentaries. Now Faith Wallis, known for her Bedan scholarship, especially for Bede's The Reckoning of Time, has produced a translation of the Commentary with introduction and very informative notes that superbly complements Gryson's edition. Her accurate translation of Bede's work along with an informative commentary condenses Gryson's French and Latin notes and adds some additional references. William Weinrich, professor of historical theology at Concordia Seminary and an authority on women in church history, in Latin Commentaries on Revelation (2012), has provided introductions to and translations of four early Latin commentaries, by Victorinus, Apringius, Caesarius, and Bede. His translation of the latter is quite readable with only an occasional inappropriate word (e.g., "hotel" instead of "inn" for Augustine's "hospitio" in the Praefatio, 37), but Wallis's translation, besides being accurate and occasionally adding in brackets Bede's Latin wording, has the advantage of indicating by the use of italics and notes when Bede incorporates within his commentary (as he very frequently does in this early work) comments by patristic authorities such as Tyconius, Primasius, Gregory, and Augustine; her book also provides a Select Bibliography (pp. 292-308) and an excellent Index of Sources and Parallel Passages (pp. 309-17). Bede introduces his work with a verse epigraph, as he does for some of his other earlier works, but this is the only one to precede a biblical commentary. The preface is divided into two sections, the first one on the internal divisions or sections of Revelation (helpfully outlined in Wallis's Table 1 on pp. 62-64) and the second part on the method of interpretation of revelation as proposed by Tyconius. As was usual in his earlier commentaries, Bede takes each verse and provides a brief elucidation and commentary on each verse of Revelation. Bede shapes the meaning of the text by using Primasius and Tyconius and inserting appropriate passages from Augustine, Gregory, and Jerome. In his commentary Bede highlights and stresses a number of themes, such as the Last Judgment and the need for reform. Bede taking the concluding words of Revelation (22:21) to assault the Pelagians for trusting in their own virtues and the Donatists for their exclusivity, stresses that the Lord's grace should "be with you all." For readers who know Bede's works the question must arise: why did Bede, whose writings are seriously concerned about his world and the church but are certainly not apocalyptic, produce as his very first biblical treatise the Commentary on Revelation? Wallis takes up the issue in the section of the Introduction, Date and Circumstances of Composition. She points out that although Bede treats the future end of the world in the closing chapters of The Reckoning of Time and his poem On Judgment Day, "the end is near"Bede: Commentary on Revelation. Translated with introduction and notes by Faith Wallis. Translated Texts for Historians 58. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2013. Introduction, pp. 1-96, text, pp. 99-286, Appendix: The capitula lectionum on Revelation ascribed to Bede, pp. 287-91. ISBN 978-1-84631-845-0 George Hardin Brown Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2087 brown@stanford.edu It is ironic that of Bede's nineteen commentaries on Scripture his very first one written at the beginning of his career, this commentary on the Book of Revelation, has now received more careful and extensive scholarship than all the rest. In the past two years an eminent biblical scholar and editor has produced a superb edition of Bede's Commentary on Revelation and two fine scholars have produced translations. Roger Gryson's Bedae Presbyteri Expositio Apocalypseos, Corpus Christianorum Series Latina 121A (Turnhout: Brepols, 2001) is the best edition of all of Bede's commentaries. Now Faith Wallis, known for her Bedan scholarship, especially for Bede's The Reckoning of Time, has produced a translation of the Commentary with introduction and very informative notes that superbly complements Gryson's edition. Her accurate translation of Bede's work along with an informative commentary condenses Gryson's French and Latin notes and adds some additional references. William Weinrich, professor of historical theology at Concordia Seminary and an authority on women in church history, in Latin Commentaries on Revelation (2012), has provided introductions to and translations of four early Latin commentaries, by Victorinus, Apringius, Caesarius, and Bede. His translation of the latter is quite readable with only an occasional inappropriate word (e.g., "hotel" instead of "inn" for Augustine's "hospitio" in the Praefatio, 37), but Wallis's translation, besides being accurate and occasionally adding in brackets Bede's Latin wording, has the advantage of indicating by the use of italics and notes when Bede incorporates within his commentary (as he very frequently does in this early work) comments by patristic authorities such as Tyconius, Primasius, Gregory, and Augustine; her book also provides a Select Bibliography (pp. 292-308) and an excellent Index of Sources and Parallel...

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