Fighting for Foreigners: Immigration and Its Impact on Japanese Democracy

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9780801447150: Fighting for Foreigners: Immigration and Its Impact on Japanese Democracy
Críticas:

"Shipper, through years of ethnographic fieldwork, addresses the impact of illegal immigrants on the quality of Japanese democracy. He concludes that illegal immigrants and their problems have mobilized grassroots faith-based and secular Japanese nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and have improved the quality of deliberative democracy in Japan by doing so. He uses the framework of associative activism to explain how local activists in the course of solving practical problems influence local governments and thereby have a transformative effect on otherwise inflexible political institutions. Shipper notes the relative effectiveness of Japanese organized groups in addressing the needs of illegal immigrants in contrast to the ineffectiveness of immigrant ethnic associations. His work offers a good summary of Japanese immigration policy with its racial characteristics and explores how NGOs challenge the abuse of foreigner crime statistics by self-interested politicians and police. An important thread in the book illuminates the relationship between international norms such as UN treaties and the openness of the Japanese government to NGOs lobbying for the rights of foreigners. Summing Up: Essential." Choice, June 2009"

"Fighting for Foreigners is an interesting and thoughtful intervention on the subject of immigration in Japan. It is crisply written and based on very impressive research. Apichai W. Shipper's exposure of crucial (and disheartening) tensions between ethnic organizations and illegal immigrants in Japan is particularly incisive and valuable. It will be as welcome a contribution to debates about Asian diasporas as it will be to those on Japanese social politics." David Leheny, Henry Wendt III '55 Professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University"

"Many scholars have of late concerned themselves with demonstrating the multicultural nature of the Japanese society against the conventional view of a homogeneous Japan. In Fighting for Foreigners, Apichai W. Shipper goes beyond simple demonstration and paves the way toward an understanding of Japan as developing a multiethnic democracy through 'associative activism, ' whereby numerous grassroots Japanese NGOs support illegal foreigners residing in Japan. This is a pathbreaking work in conceptualizing a Japan in which increasing numbers of foreigners, legal and illegal, will be working and staying in the foreseeable future." Harumi Befu, Stanford University"

"Shipper's work offers a good summary of Japanese immigration policy with its racial characteristics and explores how NGOs challenge the abuse of foreigner crime statistics by self-interested politicians and police. An important thread in the book illuminates the relationship between international norms such as UN treaties and the openness of the Japanese government to NGOs lobbying for the rights of foreigners. Summing Up: Essential." Choice"

"Shipper argues that by working from the bottom up, immigrant rights organizations have pursued policies of pragmatic and creative activism. They are problem solvers in an environment in which their potential clients are without political resources. In the process of dealing with specific problems, they have helped to create new processes, informal institutions, and protections." Perspectives on Politics"

"Fighting for Foreigners is an interesting and thoughtful intervention on the subject of immigration in Japan. It is crisply written and based on very impressive research. Apichai W. Shipper's exposure of crucial (and disheartening) tensions between ethnic organizations and illegal immigrants in Japan is particularly incisive and valuable. It will be as welcome a contribution to debates about Asian diasporas as it will be to those on Japanese social politics." David Leheny, Henry Wendt III '55 Professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University"

"Many scholars have of late concerned themselves with demonstrating the multicultural nature of the Japanese society against the conventional view of a homogeneous Japan. In Fighting for Foreigners, Apichai W. Shipper goes beyond simple demonstration and paves the way toward an understanding of Japan as developing a multiethnic democracy through 'associative activism, ' whereby numerous grassroots Japanese NGOs support illegal foreigners residing in Japan. This is a pathbreaking work in conceptualizing a Japan in which increasing numbers of foreigners, legal and illegal, will be working and staying in the foreseeable future." Harumi Befu, Stanford University"

"Shipper's work offers a good summary of Japanese immigration policy with its racial characteristics and explores how NGOs challenge the abuse of foreigner crime statistics by self-interested politicians and police. An important thread in the book illuminates the relationship between international norms such as UN treaties and the openness of the Japanese government to NGOs lobbying for the rights of foreigners. Summing Up: Essential."--Choice



"Shipper argues that by working from the bottom up, immigrant rights organizations have pursued policies of pragmatic and creative activism. They are problem solvers in an environment in which their potential clients are without political resources. In the process of dealing with specific problems, they have helped to create new processes, informal institutions, and protections."--Perspectives on Politics



"Fighting for Foreigners is an interesting and thoughtful intervention on the subject of immigration in Japan. It is crisply written and based on very impressive research. Apichai W. Shipper's exposure of crucial (and disheartening) tensions between ethnic organizations and illegal immigrants in Japan is particularly incisive and valuable. It will be as welcome a contribution to debates about Asian diasporas as it will be to those on Japanese social politics."--David Leheny, Henry Wendt III '55 Professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University



"Many scholars have of late concerned themselves with demonstrating the multicultural nature of the Japanese society against the conventional view of a homogeneous Japan. In Fighting for Foreigners, Apichai W. Shipper goes beyond simple demonstration and paves the way toward an understanding of Japan as developing a multiethnic democracy through 'associative activism, ' whereby numerous grassroots Japanese NGOs support illegal foreigners residing in Japan. This is a pathbreaking work in conceptualizing a Japan in which increasing numbers of foreigners, legal and illegal, will be working and staying in the foreseeable future."--Harumi Befu, Stanford University

Reseña del editor:

Although stereotypically homogenized and hostile to immigrants, Japan has experienced an influx of foreigners from Asia and Latin America in recent decades. In Fighting for Foreigners, Apichai W. Shipper details how, in response, Japanese citizens have established a variety of local advocacy groups--some faith based, some secular--to help immigrants secure access to social services, economic equity, and political rights.

Drawing on his years of ethnographic fieldwork and a pragmatic account of political motivation he calls associative activism, Shipper asserts that institutions that support illegal foreigners make the most dramatic contributions to democratic multiculturalism. The changing demographics of Japan have been stimulating public discussions, the political participation of marginalized groups, and calls for fair treatment of immigrants. Nongovernmental organizations established by the Japanese have been more effective than the ethnically particular associations formed by migrants themselves, Shipper finds. Activists who initially work in concert to solve specific and local problems eventually become more ambitious in terms of political representation and opinion formation.

As debates about the costs and benefits of immigration rage across the developed world, Shipper's research offers a refreshing new perspective: rather than undermining democracy in industrialized society, immigrants can make a positive institutional contribution to vibrant forms of democratic multiculturalism.

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