Teaching the New Basic Skills

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9780684827391: Teaching the New Basic Skills
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Fifteen years ago, a U.S. high school diploma was a ticket to the middle class. No longer. The skills required to earn a decent income have changed radically. The skills taught in most U.S. schools have not. Today the average 30-year-old person with a high school diploma earns $20,200, and the nation faces a future of growing inequality and division. Teaching the New Basic Skills shows how to avoid such a future. By telling stories of real people in real businesses and real schools, the book shows the skills students need to get decent jobs and how schools can change to teach those skills. Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America. In today's competitive economy, these firms search for applicants with the New Basic Skills -- the mix of hard and soft skills that all high-wage employers now require. Murnane and Levy then shift their analysis to schools, asking how they can more effectively teach these New Basic Skills. By using case studies the authors show that popular school reform proposals -- higher standards, school choice, national standards, charter schools, more money -- can only be the first half of a solution to the nation's school problem. When they work as advertised, they force a school to change the way it does business. But each of these reforms needs a second half, a strategy for guiding schools toward the changes that raise student skills. The authors show how that strategy rests on five management principles that focus a school on student achievement. These principles grow out of the experiences of real schools doing the dirty work of educational reform: an elementary school in East Austin, Texas organizing low-income Hispanic parents around higher educational performance, an affluent New England community retraining its teachers, the state of Vermont devising new ways to measure the math skills employers require, a Boston high school creating incentives for low-income minority students to devote more time and attention to schoolwork. Superintendents, governors and business leaders agree on the importance of this book as evidenced in the forewords by Robert Galvin, Chairman of Motorola, and Thomas Payzant, school superintendent of Boston. For those who care about the success of U.S. schools, Teaching the New Basic Skills is an optimistic guide to the future and a must read.

Über den Autor:

Richard J. Murnane is a Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Frank Levy is the Daniel Rose Professor of Urban Economics at MIT. Both authors live in Newton, Massachusetts.

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Murnane, Richard J.; Levy, Frank
Verlag: Free Press, New York (1996)
ISBN 10: 0684827395 ISBN 13: 9780684827391
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Robinson Street Books, IOBA
(Binghamton, NY, USA)
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Buchbeschreibung Free Press, New York, 1996. Hardcover. Buchzustand: Fine. 0684827395 Near fine in near fine dust jacket. First edition Quality, Value, Experience. Media Shipped in New Boxes. Artikel-Nr. BING89613377

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2.

Murnane, Richard J.; Levy, Frank
Verlag: Free Press, New York (1996)
ISBN 10: 0684827395 ISBN 13: 9780684827391
Gebraucht Hardcover Erstausgabe Anzahl: 1
Anbieter
Robinson Street Books, IOBA
(Binghamton, NY, USA)
Bewertung
[?]

Buchbeschreibung Free Press, New York, 1996. Hardcover. Buchzustand: Fine. First Edition. 0684827395 From Publishers Weekly According to Murnane, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and Levy, professor of urban economics at MIT, schools are failing because they are not teaching children the "new basic skills" that must be mastered to earn a middle-class income. Those skills are defined by the authors as "hard" skills such as math and reading, "soft" skills including the ability to work in groups and make presentations and, finally, the ability to use personal computers. The authors argue that the best way to teach these skills is for schools to retrain their teachers by adopting principles used by businesses to motivate their managers. Although the authors' lengthy explanations of those principles have some interesting points, Murnane and Levy are occasionally unclear about how to apply them. They also make the controversial assumption that schools are for training students to earn a living, and they do not address the complexities of a shrinking job market. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. Review Ed Richardson State Superintendent of Education, Alabama As an educator in the midst of educational reform, I especially enjoyed your fifth principle of perseverance and the lack of a "magic bullet".Thorough and common sense books like yours will assist us in our efforts. Quality, Value, Experience. Media Shipped in New Boxes. Artikel-Nr. BN1616

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Frank;Murnane Levy
Verlag: Free Press (1996)
ISBN 10: 0684827395 ISBN 13: 9780684827391
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Rheinberg-Buch
(Bergisch Gladbach, Deutschland)
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Buchbeschreibung Free Press, 1996. Taschenbuch. Buchzustand: Gebraucht. Gebraucht - Gut - Fifteen years ago, a U.S. high school diploma was a ticket to the middle class. No longer. The skills required to earn a decent income have changed radically. The skills taught in most U.S. schools have not. Today the average 30-year-old person with a high school diploma earns $20,200, and the nation faces a future of growing inequality and division. Teaching the New Basic Skills shows how to avoid such a future. By telling stories of real people in real businesses and real schools, the book shows the skills students need to get decent jobs and how schools can change to teach those skills. Richard Murnane and Frank Levy begin by describing the hiring processes of best practice firms like Northwestern Mutual Life and Honda of America. In today's competitive economy, these firms search for applicants with the New Basic Skills -- the mix of hard and soft skills that all high-wage employers now require. Murnane and Levy then shift their analysis to schools, asking how they can more effectively teach these New Basic Skills. By using case studies the authors show that popular school reform proposals -- higher standards, school choice, national standards, charter schools, more money -- can only be the first half of a solution to the nation's school problem. When they work as advertised, they force a school to change the way it does business. But each of these reforms needs a second half, a strategy for guiding schools toward the changes that raise student skills. The authors show how that strategy rests on five management principles that focus a school on student achievement. These principles grow out of the experiences of real schools doing the dirty work of educational reform: an elementary school in East Austin, Texas organizing low-income Hispanic parents around higher educational performance, an affluent New England community retraining its teachers, the state of Vermont devising new ways to measure the math skills employers require, a Boston high school creating incentives for low-income minority students to devote more time and attention to schoolwork. Superintendents, governors and business leaders agree on the importance of this book as evidenced in the forewords by Robert Galvin, Chairman of Motorola, and Thomas Payzant, school superintendent of Boston. For those who care about the success of U.S. schools, Teaching the New Basic Skills is an optimistic guide to the future and a must read. 272 pp. Englisch. Artikel-Nr. INF3002619730

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